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Healthy Tip of the Week: How to Stay Hydrated

By Stephanie E - Jenny Craig Reviewed by Briana Rodriquez, R.D. Expert Reviewed

Each week, we’ll highlight some of our favorite healthy habits and the benefits behind them. We’ll also share a quick and simple tip from Heather Lake, a Jenny Craig Health & Lifestyle Contributor, to help support your weight loss goals and inspire you throughout the day! This 12-week series will focus on everything from how to stay hydrated to delicious ways to incorporate more protein into your meals.

 
 
 
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Video Transcript

Hi, I'm Heather Lake, a health and lifestyle contributor for Jenny Craig. Here's your healthy tip for the week. Stay hydrated. Drinking water isn’t just about quenching your thirst — it also helps your body with other functions such as circulation and digestion. While experts agree water consumption varies for everyone, a general rule of thumb is to try to aim for at least eight 8-ounce glasses per day or about half of your body weight in ounces. My favorite way to stay hydrated is to keep a reusable water bottle on hand and refill it throughout the day.

Tips to stay hydrated + health benefits of drinking water

Curious about the health benefits of drinking water? We’ve got good news: There are plenty of them! If you’re wondering how to stay hydrated (trust us, it’s important for weight loss!) and how much water you need to stay hydrated, you’re in the right place. Let’s break it down.

3 important health benefits of drinking water

If you’re thirsty, it’s likely that you’re already slightly dehydrated, experts say.1 Not sure how to stay hydrated? A general rule of thumb is to drink at least eight, 8-ounce glasses of water each day to avoid common symptoms of dehydration, including headaches, fatigue and dizziness. However, everyone’s water intake needs vary based on their lifestyle and other factors that are not limited to height, weight, activity level, and the climate. When in doubt, consult your physician to find out how much water you should be drinking every day.

 

Drinking plenty of water may also help to:

  1. jc-hh-Image3.jpgSupport weight loss. Adults following reduced-calorie diets who drank 500 milliliters (about 16 ounces) of water before meals lost more weight than those who focused on dieting alone.2 Drinking water before meals may help you feel more satisfied and less likely to overeat. Plus, choosing water over sugar-sweetened drinks is a quick and easy way to cut down on calories.
  2. Boost metabolism. A small study found that drinking water helped to temporarily boost metabolism by 30%, and lasted for about an hour.3 In the study, participants drank 500 milliliters of water and experienced a slight increase in their metabolic rates.
  3. Aid digestion. Water helps to break down food as it moves through the digestive system. Once food is broken down, its nutrients are absorbed by the body and are used for energy, growth and to repair cells.4

Here’s how to stay hydrated

Water is essential for all your body’s functions. Around 80% of your water intake comes from water and other drinks; the other 20% comes from the foods you eat, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine say.5 For more simple ways to drink water throughout the day, these 10 tips can help!

 

Stay tuned for next week’s healthy tip of the week by signing up for our health and wellness newsletter. You’ll also receive a complimentary copy of our quarterly magazine, Healthy Edition. Until then, stay hydrated!

 

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Stephanie Eng-Aponte


bio-photo-stephanie.jpgStephanie Eng-Aponte is a copywriter for Jenny Craig and has written for the health and wellness, tech, and environmental industries. Stephanie graduated from Rutgers University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism and Media Studies. They employ an “eat first, write later” approach to food blogging and enjoy the occasional Oxford comma. Outside of writing, you can find them photographing a muttley crew of rescue pups, brewing kombucha, or exploring San Diego.

 

Favorite healthy snack: green apple slices with sunflower butter

 

 

Reviewed by Briana Rodriquez, RDN

 

 

bio-photo-briana.pngBriana is a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist and Certified Personal Trainer for Jenny Craig, based in Carlsbad, California. She is passionate about utilizing food as functional and preventative medicine. Guided by a simplistic and optimistic approach, Briana’s philosophy is to help people improve their health and achieve their goals through the development of sustainable habits to live a healthy life. In her free time, you can find her strength training, indoor cycling, coffee tasting, and at local eateries with her husband and two dogs.

 

Favorite healthy snack: peanut butter with celery alongside a grapefruit-flavored sparkling water (so refreshing!)

 


 

Quote

This article is based on scientific research and/or other scientific articles and was written by an experienced health and lifestyle contributor and fact-checked by Briana Rodriquez, RDN, Registered Dietitian Nutritionist at Jenny Craig.

 

Our goal at Jenny Craig is to provide the most up-to-date and objective information on health-related topics, so our readers can make informed decisions based on factual content. All articles undergo an extensive review process, and depending on topic, are reviewed by a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) or Nutritionist, to ensure accuracy.

 

This article contains trusted sources including scientific, peer-reviewed papers. All references are hyperlinked at the end of the article to take readers directly to the source.

 

Sources:

[1] https://www.bcm.edu/news/sports-medicine/thirsty-you-are-already-dehydrated

[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2859815/

[3] https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article/88/12/6015/2661518

[4] https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/digestive-diseases/digestive-system-how-it-works

[5] http://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd/Reports/2004/Dietary-Reference-Intakes-Water-Potassium-Sodium-Chloride-and-Sulfate.aspx

Edited by Stephanie E - Jenny Craig


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