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Tired All of the Time? Get Your Energy Back with These Tips

By Stephanie E - Jenny Craig Science-Backed

If you’re tired all the time, or feel like you have no energy, too little sleep might not be the only thing to blame. In fact, a recent survey found that 45 percent of Americans who slept 7-8 hours each night said they still felt fatigued or tired up to three times per week!1 Dealing with stress and weight gain can both affect your health in surprising ways, and research is finding more connections between obesity and low energy levels.2  

So can losing weight increase your energy? It definitely can help — and beyond boosting your physical energy, weight loss can have a significant impact on your overall health. Learn more about the benefits of weight loss when it comes to improving your energy and a few simple adjustments you can make today to put a little more pep in your step. 

It’s more than just a number on a scale 

You don’t need to lose a large amount of weight to notice a difference in your energy levels. Studies have shown that losing just 5-10 percent of your weight may benefit your health in a number of ways, including a reduced risk for obesity-related chronic diseases.3 Start with a manageable weight loss goal, which is a great way to keep your eyes on the prize. You can always adjust your goal weight once you’ve reached your first benchmark.

Energy & weight loss 

With increased energy, it might be easier to balance your lifestyle with your responsibilities, and find the motivation for the activities you enjoy most. Here’s how weight loss could impact your energy levels:

1. Less fatigue during the day

red shoes running up blue stairsUp to 30 percent of the population may experience Excessive Daytime Sleepiness (EDS), which is powerful drowsiness during the day, according to a study conducted by researchers at Penn State College of Medicine.4 The researchers found connections between increased BMI and the condition, explaining weight gain predicted which study participants would experience EDS, while weight loss helped predict who would stop experiencing symptoms. In a separate study, researchers found a similar relationship between BMI and sleepiness – participants were more likely to report feeling tired as their BMI increased.5

 

When your body carries less weight, it uses less energy to help you move throughout the day.6 Losing weight may also help your body use oxygen more efficiently, making it easier to catch your breath during everyday tasks, like walking, cleaning or climbing stairs.7 

2. Get better sleep

woman sleeping on pillowLosing weight may also help you sleep better, which could result in increased energy and a boosted mood throughout the day.7 Poor sleep quality or too little rest can leave you feeling sluggish and irritable. In one study, individuals who lost at least five percent of their body weight over six months gained an average of 22 minutes of additional sleep each night.8 This same group also reported better sleep quality and improvements to their overall mood.

 

Those who are overweight have an increased likelihood of developing obstructive sleep apnea, which occurs when the airway becomes partially or completely blocked during sleep.9 People with sleep apnea may frequently wake throughout the night and may experience other health complications. Sleep is crucial to your overall health as it helps your body recharge and rejuvenate. Not only does it benefit your health, but sleep may also affect your weight loss. (Try these tips to help get a better night’s sleep!) 

3. Eat well to feel energized

jenny craig foodsCreating a routine that aligns with your body’s circadian rhythm could support your weight loss and benefit your energy levels. Eating balanced, nutritious meals combined with physical activity may help fight fatigue.10 And you don’t really even need to break a sweat! Incorporating fresh vegetables, fruit, lean proteins, and moderate amounts of whole grains and healthy fats into your diet is a great place to start. 

 

Sync up with your circadian rhythm by eating your meals within the first 12 hours of the day (for example, 7:00 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.)  – and abstain from food and caloric drinks for the remaining 12 hours. Most of those remaining 12 hours are spent sleeping.  Jenny Craig’s Rapid Results program taps into Nobel Prize-winning science around circadian rhythms to align your weight loss goals with your body’s natural cycles. With Rapid Results, you can enjoy delicious chef-crafted meals and snacks (plus, dessert!) and personalized, one-on-one support from a dedicated consultant.

 

Learn more about Rapid Results and how to support your energy levels with weight loss – contact us to book your free appointment today!

 

JC-Blog-CTA-Start-Your-Journey.png

 

Sources:

[1] https://today.yougov.com/topics/lifestyle/articles-reports/2015/06/02/sleep-and-dreams
[2] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3506799/
[3] https://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/losing_weight/index.html
[4] https://news.psu.edu/story/356548/2015/05/07/research/role-obesity-and-depression-excessive-daytime-sleepiness
[5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5027628/
[6] https://www.cnn.com/2015/02/18/health/weight-loss-mystery/index.html
[7] https://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20140624/healthy-weight-loss-may-bring-better-sleep-brighter-mood
[8] https://www.webmd.com/diet/news/20140624/healthy-weight-loss-may-bring-better-sleep-brighter-mood

[9] https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/losing-weight-and-belly-fat-improves-sleep-201211145531
[10] https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/248002.php
 

Stephanie Eng-Aponte

bio-photo-stephanie.jpg.eef213ad82f6fc52f4126898595992fc.jpgStephanie Eng-Aponte is a copywriter for Jenny Craig, based in Carlsbad, CA. They’ve focused on writing within the health and wellness space for the last several years, but have dabbled in the tech and environmental industries. Stephanie graduated from Rutgers University with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Journalism and Media Studies. Stephanie employs a “eat first, write later” approach to food blogging and enjoys the occasional Oxford comma. Outside of writing, you can find Stephanie photographing a muttley crew of rescue pups, brewing kombucha, or exploring San Diego.

 

Favorite healthy snack: Green apple slices with sunflower butter.

 

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This article is based on scientific research and/or other scientific articles and is written by experienced health and lifestyle contributors and reviewed by certified professionals.

 

Our goal at Jenny Craig is to provide the most up-to-date and objective information on health-related topics, so our readers can make informed decisions based on factual content. All articles undergo an extensive review process, and depending on the topic, are reviewed by a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist (RDN) or Nutritionist, to ensure accuracy.

 

This article contains trusted sources including scientific, peer-reviewed papers. All references are hyperlinked at the end of the article to take readers directly to the source.

 


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