Sign in to follow this  
Eat Well

Eat Well

Eat Well

Quiz: How Much Do You Know About Breakfast?

How much do you know about the most important meal of the day? Take our quiz and find out!  
Eat Well

How to Eat Healthy on a Budget: Infographic

Wondering if eating out is cheaper than preparing healthy meals at home or having nutritious ready-made meals on hand? Find out the truth and ways you can still eat healthy on a budget! 
Eat Well

A New Study Just Revealed the Best Time to Eat for Heart Health

If you’re like many people, life may keep you so busy that you don’t have the time or energy to put much thought into your eating patterns. You might rush out the door in the morning without eating breakfast, grab something on the run for lunch and nosh on a few things here and there throughout the day. It’s not until the evening that you have a chance to sit down and eat a full — perhaps too full — meal.   But eating this way may not be good for your health, a new study1 shows. Researchers have found that consuming too many calories in the evening may increase your chances of developing prediabetes and high blood pressure, which together may increase your cardiovascular risks.2   Here’s what you need to know to keep your heart — and the rest of you — as healthy as possible. What the Research Found In preliminary research1 that looked at the timing of meals among more than 12,000 Hispanic/Latino adults, researchers found that eating 30 percent or more daily calories after 6 p.m. was associated with a 23 percent higher risk of developing high blood pressure and a 19 percent higher risk of developing prediabetes when compared with people who ate less than 30 percent of their calories after that time. In this study, which was funded by the American Heart Association (AHA) and presented at the AHA Scientific Sessions in November 2018, more than half of the study participants reported consuming more than 30 percent of their calories after 6 p.m.    The researchers also found that every one percent increase in the number of calories eaten after 6 p.m. (approximately 20 calories in a 2,000-calorie daily diet, for instance) was associated with higher levels of fasting glucose, insulin and insulin resistance, all of which are linked to an increased risk of diabetes.1 Compared with other study participants, people who ate later also had higher systolic and diastolic blood pressure readings.3   Interestingly, the study did not find that eating later was associated with an increased risk of becoming overweight or developing central adiposity (belly fat),1 although other research has found such links. Experts at Harvard Health,4 for instance, say that while the results are “not unanimous,” the majority of studies show that eating late in the day contributes to weight gain and other potential health problems.   According to the AHA study, the increased risks by eating late has to do with the body’s natural circadian rhythm, an internal clock that helps regulate our waking, eating and sleeping patterns, among other functions.5 The researchers suggest that eating later in the day disrupts the internal clock, increasing the risk of different types of health problems, including diabetes and heart disease.6   While the AHA study focused on a specific demographic, the authors state that the findings may apply to the U.S. population in general.1 In fact, an earlier Scientific Statement7 from the AHA says the planning and timing of meals and snacks, including not skipping breakfast and eating more calories earlier in the day as opposed to later, may help reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease. They call for more studies to investigate this connection. More Tips to Keep Your Heart Healthy Besides limiting your calorie intake in the evening and eating more calories in the morning than later in the day, there are other steps you can take to help keep your heart healthy. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’s) Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion recommends the following:8  <br>1. Eat a healthy diet. The HHS’s National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) suggests that you:9 Emphasize vegetables, fruit, whole grains, and fat-free or low-fat dairy products  Include beans, eggs, fish, lean meats, nuts and poultry in your diet Limit your intake of saturated and trans fats, sodium and added sugars Monitor your portion sizes   2. Stay active. To gain major health benefits, the NHLBI10 recommends that you do at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity aerobic activity every week. Check out this beginner’s guide to exercise to get started.   <br>3. Stay at a healthy weight. Click here to take a free BMI assessment and find out if you fall within a healthy range.   <br>4. Don’t smoke or expose yourself to secondhand smoke. <br>5. Control your cholesterol and blood pressure. <br>6. Manage your stress. <br>7. Drink alcohol in moderation, if at all. (Find out how alcohol hinders weight loss.)   In addition, the Cleveland Clinic recommends these steps to help keep your heart healthy:11     Get enough sleep. Research has shown that adults who sleep fewer than six hours per night are approximately twice as likely to have a stroke or heart attack as those who get six to eight hours per night. In addition to making a commitment to getting an adequate amount of sleep, practice “sleep hygiene” to improve the quality of your Z’s.  Get up and move around during the day. Studies have found a link between long periods of sitting and an increase in cardiovascular events. In addition, sitting for long periods of time — such as when traveling — increases your likelihood of developing blood clots. So if you work at a job that requires a lot of sitting, make it a priority to get up and walk around several times throughout the day; many experts suggest doing so at least once per hour.  Heart Health and Weight Loss Since maintaining a healthy weight is also important to keep your heart healthy, focusing on weight loss can help if you’re overweight. Here are a few tips to get started.      <br>1. Focus on breakfast, not dinner. In addition to the findings from the AHA research, another study12 found that eating a substantial breakfast and a small dinner is better for weight loss than eating a small breakfast and a large dinner.     <br>2. Eat with your circadian rhythm in mind. Eating in sync with your circadian rhythm — basically, during daylight hours — can help with weight loss,13 in addition to potentially improving many other aspects of your health, including hormone release, metabolism, digestion, depression and more.14 <br>3. Weigh yourself daily. Another study presented at the Scientific Sessions15 analyzed the self-weighing patterns of more than 1,000 adults, and whether there were differences in weight according to these patterns. The researchers found that people who weighed themselves six or seven times per week lost 1.7 percent of their body weight over the course of a year. People who never weighed themselves, or who did so once per week, didn’t lose any weight during the same timeframe. Previous studies15-17 have also found that people who weigh themselves daily tend to lose more weight than those who weigh themselves less often. Researchers believe the self-monitoring involved with weighing yourself daily increases your self-awareness of how different behaviors affect your weight, which can inspire you to make necessary changes.  <br> Whether you’re 27 or 77, it’s never too early — or late — to commit to the health of your heart. We hope you’ll consider these important findings in coming up with a strategy to help keep your heart in top form.   If you’re interested in bettering your health — Jenny Craig can help. Set up a free appointment and talk to a personal weight loss consultant who will work with you to achieve your goals!      Sources: [1] https://newsroom.heart.org/news/big-high-calorie-meals-after-6-p-m-may-increase-heart-disease-risk-for-hispanics [2] https://newsarchive.heart.org/study-high-blood-pressure-and-prediabetes-together-increases-risk-to-heart/ [3] http://www.diabetesincontrol.com/newsletter/issue-965/ [4] https://blog.content.health.harvard.edu/blog/columns/does-eating-late-make-you-gain-weight/ [5] https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/pages/Factsheet_CircadianRhythms.aspx [6] https://www.aarp.org/health/healthy-living/info-2018/heart-healthy-eating-aha.html [7] http://newsroom.heart.org/news/meal-planning-timing-may-impact-heart-health [8] https://healthfinder.gov/HealthTopics/Category/health-conditions-and-diseases/heart-health/keep-your-heart-healthy [9] https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health/educational/lose_wt/eat/calories.htm [10] https://www.nhlbi.nih.gov/health-topics/physical-activity-and-your-heart [11] https://health.clevelandclinic.org/5-things-to-do-daily-to-keep-your-heart-healthy/ [12] https://blog.content.health.harvard.edu/blog/columns/does-eating-late-make-you-gain-weight/ [13] https://www.npr.org/sections/thesalt/2015/03/10/389596946/circadian-surprise-how-our-body-clocks-help-shape-our-waistlines [14] https://www.nigms.nih.gov/Education/Pages/Factsheet_CircadianRhythms.aspx [15] https://newsroom.heart.org/news/daily-weighing-may-be-key-to-losing-weight?preview=39b3 [16] https://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0113164 [17] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4380831/
Eat Well

10 Science-Backed Reasons Why Breakfast is Best

If you had to choose your favorite meal of the day, which one would it be? If you answered ‘breakfast,’ you may be onto something good. Not only is your morning meal a great way to start the day, but it can also help support your health and weight loss goals. Mounting research also indicates that skipping breakfast may contribute to weight gain as well as other health complications, such as heart disease, high cholesterol, elevated blood pressure levels and diabetes.1 So grab a cup of coffee and whip up some scrambled eggs — here are ten science-backed reasons why breakfast is best. . 1. Your Waistline Will Benefit One of the simplest ways your weight loss efforts can benefit is by eating breakfast! Studies have found that by eating a substantial meal in the morning and reducing your caloric intake at night (also known as front-loading), you may be able to lose more weight than by doing the reverse.2 This is because your body follows a daily cycle, typically divided into two 12-hour periods, that are dictated by daytime and nighttime. Known as your circadian rhythm, or “internal clock,” your body naturally uses fuel more efficiently in the morning than it does in the evening. So, by eating breakfast, you’ll be working with your body’s natural rhythm — which in turn may support your weight loss goals.   2. Feel More Satiated Throughout the Day We’ve all been there: you’re in a rush to get out the door in the morning and before you know it, it’s almost noon — and you haven’t had anything to eat. Ravenous, you scarf down anything you can get your hands on (like the donuts in the breakroom). Between work, family and other obligations, breakfast can often take a backseat, especially if it adds another item to your to-do list. But there’s a reason you should have something convenient and healthy to eat in the a.m.: studies show that people who tend to eat a hearty breakfast are more likely to feel satiated throughout the day (so you won’t even look twice at that pastry).3 Start your day off right and enjoy a morning meal — if you’re in a pinch for time, try prepping something the night before, or have a ready-made, pre-prepared meal on hand to take with you on-the-go. 3. Avoid Overeating Later in the Day While you may think passing up breakfast will reduce your caloric intake, research says otherwise.  Why? Because when you skip your morning meal, you’re more prone to overeat later in the day — which can lead to weight gain.4 Experts agree that eating breakfast is a valuable strategy to help avoid overcompensating with high-calorie, less-than-stellar options late at night.5 4. Have More Energy After sleeping for 7-9 hours at night, your body needs fuel to power its daily functions. Skip breakfast, and your body may start to use other energy sources (like your muscles).6 For sustained energy, aim for a mix of protein and healthy carbohydrates that your body will digest slower than refined carbohydrates (like pastries or sugary cereal). A few excellent choices include a veggie and egg scramble, a nonfat plain Greek yogurt sprinkled with fresh berries and a few almonds, or a piece of toast with a teaspoon of nut butter and a small piece of fruit.   5. Kickstart Your Metabolism Research supports the theory that eating breakfast may help your metabolism.7 A recent study found that even if breakfast increased a person’s overall daily caloric intake, the additional calories were offset by other energy-burning benefits.8 Since your metabolism is most efficient in the morning, you’ll be fueling your body at a time when it’s primed to digest food.   6. Potentially Lower Your Levels of “LDL” or “Bad” Cholesterol Yet another reason to eat breakfast — your cholesterol levels may improve. Research indicates that individuals who regularly skip their morning meal tend to have higher levels of “LDL” or “bad” cholesterol — which can eventually lead to heart disease.9-10 7. You May Reduce Your Risk of Diabetes Starting your day with a healthy meal can also help to control your blood sugar — as people who eat breakfast tend to have steadier levels throughout the day.11 If you have Type 2 diabetes, experts recommend eating breakfast as well — as skipping it has been shown to spike blood sugar levels for the remainder of the day.12 8. You’ll Get More Nutrients You’re likely to consume more vitamins and minerals if your day includes breakfast.13 So go ahead and grab a piece of vitamin-rich fruit, protein-packed eggs or a fiber-filled bowl of oatmeal — you’ll be providing your body with essential nutrients!   9. Improve Your Focus at Work Feel like you’re easily distracted on the job? Breakfast can help with that, too. Without sufficient fuel in the morning, your body can go into ‘conservation mode’ — and your brain may start to slow all your bodily processes to conserve energy, which may interfere with your performance.14 Research has also found a strong correlation between children who eat breakfast and higher academic results — so breakfast is a good idea for the entire family.15 10. Keep Your BMI in a Healthy Range Before you forgo a bowl of oatmeal, consider this: breakfast skippers tend to have higher BMI’s than breakfast eaters.16 It makes sense, considering you’re more likely to avoid late-night snacks and feel more satiated throughout the day when you have a morning meal.    Ready to start your day right with a well-balanced breakfast? Jenny Craig has a wide variety of chef-crafted, nutritious options that can help you reach your weight loss goals. Contact us today to book your free appointment!     Sources: [1] https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/features/skipping-breakfast-may-increase-coronary-heart-disease-risk/ [2] https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1002/oby.20460 [3] https://www.cnn.com/2017/05/19/health/weight-loss-circadian-rhythms-drayer/index.html [4] https://academic.oup.com/aje/article/158/1/85/174075#1553730 [5] https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/05/110519113024.htm [6] https://health.clevelandclinic.org/want-to-lose-weight-boost-energy-5-reasons-to-eat-breakfast/ [7] https://physoc.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1113/JP275113 [8] http://time.com/5040325/eating-breakfast-metabolism/ [9]https://healthplans.providence.org/~/media/files/providence%20or%20migrated%20pdfs/patients%20toolkit/388.pdf [10] https://www.healthline.com/health/cholesterol-and-heart-disease#research [11] https://www.webmd.com/diet/features/many-benefits-breakfast#2 [12] https://www.endocrineweb.com/news/diabetes/17894-skipping-breakfast-bad-idea-people-type-2-diabetes [13] https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/nutrition-and-healthy-eating/in-depth/food-and-nutrition/art-20048294 [14] https://www.webmd.com/diet/features/many-benefits-breakfast#4 [15] https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/public-health-nutrition/article/association-between-breakfast-consumption-and-educational-outcomes-in-911yearold-children/8174B87D235C67D22C0913F66E1ED6B4 [16] https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/eat-breakfast-lose-weight#1
Eat Well

Holiday Hacks: Tips to Stay Healthy During the Holiday Season

While the weather might be cooling down, your social calendar is probably just starting to heat up. There’s no shortage of parties, family get-togethers and other festive events during the holidays. With a busy schedule and an abundance of incredible meals, it might feel challenging to maintain your healthy habits.    Make staying on track during the holidays easier by focusing on small, simple ways you can prioritize your health. By incorporating the right habits, you can enjoy each occasion without losing sight of your weight loss goals. Here are our tops tips to stay healthy while celebrating the holidays.  How to successfully navigate holiday meals    BYOD (Bring Your Own Dish) Not sure how to stay healthy during the holidays? While sweet and savory treats seem to be everywhere during this time of year — at work, parties and family functions — there are plenty of solutions that will keep you on track while allowing you to enjoy these events. Here’s how to set yourself up for mealtime success: Offer to bring a dish so you’ll have something delicious to eat that won’t derail your weight loss plans. Check out these 5-minute recipes for quick and delicious side dish ideas. If you are on the Jenny Craig plan, eat your Jenny Craig meal in advance and once you are at the event, enjoy items that are already on your menu like salad or fruit options.   Pay attention to portions and eating speed <br>During mealtimes, select healthier options (like non-starchy vegetables and lean proteins) and use a smaller plate to keep your portions in check. Try to also pay attention to how quickly you eat. Research has shown that people who eat quickly are more likely to gain weight, have higher blood glucose and a larger waistline.1 Eating slowly and more mindfully gives you the time to savor your food and allows your digestive system’s hormones time to signal to your brain feelings of fullness.2 This communication between your gut and your brain typically takes about 20 minutes to take effect.3 So take your time at the dinner table — enjoy each bite’s taste, texture and smell!    Reach for water <br> What you drink is just as important as what you eat. During the holidays, focus on staying hydrated and avoid high-calorie beverages, like sodas, alcohol and sugary coffee drinks. Wondering what to sip on when you’re at a holiday party? Studies show that drinking more water may help with weight loss.4 Staying properly hydrated can increase feelings of fullness during your meal — which means you may not be as inclined to reach for seconds.5 Change things up with sparkling water or a seasonal fruit-infused flavor, like grapefruit, pomegranate or pear. To infuse water, slice your fruit and add it to a 2-quart pitcher of water. Chill in the refrigerator for a few hours before enjoying. If you’re at an event, order a soda water and garnish it with a lemon or lime.  How to support your weight loss goals during the holidays   De-stress and improve your fitness with exercise <br> Physical activity doesn’t need to be complicated or time-consuming to be effective. It can be as simple as taking a brisk 10-minute walk during your lunch break, playing tag with your kids, or squeezing in a few exercises at home and between chores.    Even a short burst of activity can positively impact your body by boosting your metabolism, mood and heart function.6 Exercise is also a great way to manage stress, especially during the hectic holiday season. Physical activity helps reduce the body’s stress hormones, including adrenaline and cortisol. Additionally, it stimulates the production of endorphins, which are the body’s natural painkillers and mood elevators.7 The next time you’re feeling overwhelmed by your holiday to-do list, try taking 15-30 minutes to get your heart pumping.    With a little preparation, you can get on track with your weight loss goals and your holiday plans this season by being mindful of your eating habits and activity level. This year, try to create new holiday traditions that align with your health goals and get the whole family involved!    Ready to take the next step with your weight loss and healthy habits? Jenny Craig’s science-based programs offer delicious chef-crafted meals and personalized support. Book your free appointment with a consultant today and make 2019 your best year yet.       Sources: [1] https://newsroom.heart.org/news/gobbling-your-food-may-harm-your-waistline-and-heart [2] https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/why-eating-slowly-may-help-you-feel-full-faster-20101019605 <br> [3] https://www.huffingtonpost.com.au/2016/11/09/we-found-out-if-it-really-takes-20-minutes-to-feel-full_a_21602736/ <br> [4] https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/drinking-water-helps-with-weight-loss <br> [5] https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/drinking-water-helps-with-weight-loss#section2 <br> [6] https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/exercising-to-relax
Eat Well

Ask an R.D.: What’s the 80/20 Rule for Weight Loss, and Does Diet Matter More than Exercise?

You may have heard of the 80/20 rule as it relates to many different things, from business (the idea that 20 percent of workers contribute 80 percent of results) to efficiency (the concept that 80 percent of results come from 20 percent of the effort). But have you heard of the 80/20 rule as it relates to diet and exercise?   The premise is relatively simple: To lose weight, you need to consume fewer calories than your body uses as energy. And while common wisdom used to say that exercise is the best way to create such a calorie deficit, research indicates that while physical activity is a necessary component of weight loss, cutting calories through your diet is much more achievable — and necessary.1   In a nutshell, the 80/20 rule for weight loss says you should aim to cut 80 percent of your calories through diet and burn 20 percent through exercise.   We spoke with Jenny Craig’s Registered Dietitian, Briana Rodriquez, R.D., to find out more about the 80/20 rule. She shares why eating a healthy, reduced-calorie diet is the mainstay of weight loss — and how getting regular exercise can help support your weight loss … and help maintain it. Why diet should be your focus when it comes to weight loss According to Rodriquez, eating a healthy, well-rounded diet is important not just for your overall health, but for weight loss as well. And while exercise is also important for your health in a number of ways — from reducing your risk of various diseases such as diabetes and metabolic syndrome; to strengthening your bones and muscles; to improving your mental health and mood2 — it can be difficult to get enough exercise to create the calorie deficit necessary for weight loss without changing your diet.   For instance, a man who weighs 154 pounds and is 5’10” will burn approximately 280 calories by walking at a moderate pace for one hour, according to the United States Department of Agriculture.3 If he did vigorous exercise, such as running, for one hour, he would burn 590 calories. Since it’s estimated that a pound of fat is equivalent to 3,500 calories, the average person needs to reduce their caloric intake by approximately 500-1000 calories a day in order to achieve a healthy weight loss of 1-2 pounds a week.4    "Reaching that deficit through exercise alone would be difficult for many — if not most — people,” Rodriquez says. If, on the other hand, you were to skip out on eating 1 cup of ice cream, you would save approximately 273 calories. Swap a chicken drumstick for chicken breast and you can cut about 80 calories.5 If you do the math, you’ll see that you can reach that all-important calorie deficit more easily by focusing on your diet — while using exercise to support your efforts. The quality of your diet matters As important as it is for your overall health, regular exercise cannot make up for a poor-quality diet. In fact, Americans are exercising more than ever, yet the rates of obesity are rising sharply.   In 1997, for example, approximately 44 percent of U.S. adults met the 2008 federal guidelines for aerobic activity (at least 150 minutes per week of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of vigorous-intensity exercise); as of 2017, 53.8 percent did. Yet during the same timeframe, the rates of obesity among U.S. adults rose by 12 percent: from 19.4 percent in 1997 to 31.4 percent in 2017.6   At the same time, the standard American diet has suffered in quality and has become a major factor in our obesity crisis, studies have shown.7 Consider the following statistics:   About 37 percent of Americans ate fast food on any given day between 2013-2016.8 In the United States, on any given day, half of all people consume sugary drinks. Of those, 25 percent get at least 200 calories from such drinks, while 5 percent get at least 567 calories from them.9 Only one out of every 10 U.S. adults eats enough fruits or vegetables.10 In 2010, the average American took in about 23 percent more calories per day — 2,481 — than in 1970.11   And the most alarming statistic: Today, more than 70 percent of U.S. adults are overweight or obese.12   Yet Americans aren’t the only ones whose diets have suffered over the years. Researchers have found that in many countries, the rates of obesity have tripled or quadrupled over the past 30 years — at the same time that these nations’ diets have transitioned to high-calorie, highly processed fare.7 How exercise can help your efforts Always consult your physician before starting a new exercise program.   Remember: The 80/20 rule doesn’t rule out exercise; it says that it should support your weight-loss efforts. Here’s how it can help:   1. Exercise can help you over a plateau. As you lose weight and fat, your metabolism will naturally slow, leading to a plateau. Bumping up your exercise intensity and duration can help get you back into weight loss mode. Adding strength training can also help, as it will add more muscle, which in turn will burn more calories.13 Research shows that strength training also increases fat loss, especially when combined with diet modifications and aerobic exercise.1 And it can help keep you from gaining dangerous belly fat.14   2. Exercise helps with weight maintenance. In fact, observational studies suggest it is crucial.1 Researchers from the Mayo Clinic suggest that an exercise program that is reasonable and achievable (30 to 60 minutes of exercise five to seven days per week, for instance) is critical for long-term weight maintenance. Tips for healthy weight loss In addition to watching portion sizes and calorie counts, Rodriquez recommends the following strategies to help support your weight loss goals:   1. Aim to get exercise on most days. Federal guidelines15 recommend that all people get 150 minutes of moderate to vigorous physical activity per week (30 minutes, five days per week, for instance). For weight loss purposes, more exercise — up to 60 minutes per day — may be necessary. In addition, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention16 recommends that adults do muscle-strengthening exercises involving all major muscle groups at least two days per week.   2. Limit certain foods. The Harvard School of Public Health17 recommends limiting or avoiding the following foods, which have been linked to obesity: Fruit juices (even if they are 100 percent fruit juice, they can have as much sugar and as many calories as sugary sodas). Processed meats (like hot dogs or deli meat). Refined carbohydrates. Sugary drinks (like soda and energy drinks). Sweets (like candy).   3. Focus on a well-rounded diet. To promote health and weight loss, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention18 suggests the following: Eat plenty of fat-free or low-fat dairy products, fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Include lean meats in your diet, including beans, eggs, fish, nuts and poultry. Keep your diet low in added sugars, cholesterol, saturated fats, sodium and trans fats.   Remember, a combination approach — focusing on your diet and incorporating exercise — has been found to be the most effective way to lose weight. We hope you’ll use this information to structure a healthy, achievable path to weight loss.   Jenny Craig follows expert guidelines to create delicious, nutritionally balanced meals that support your weight loss goals. And if you need help with motivation, tools or other information, Jenny Craig is here to help with a balanced approach to a healthy lifestyle. Get started on your path to better health and wellness with a free appointment today!     Sources: [1] https://www.mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196(11)60971-3/fulltext [2] https://www.cdc.gov/healthyplaces/healthtopics/physactivity.htm [3] https://www.choosemyplate.gov/physical-activity-calories-burn [4] https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/weight-loss/in-depth/calories/art-20048065 [5] https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/foods/ [6] https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/nhis/earlyrelease/EarlyRelease201803.pdf [7] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4859313/ [8] https://www.cnn.com/2018/10/03/health/fast-food-consumption-cdc-study/index.html [9] https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/sugary-drinks-fact-sheet/ [10] https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2017/p1116-fruit-vegetable-consumption.html [11] http://www.pewresearch.org/fact-tank/2016/12/13/whats-on-your-table-how-americas-diet-has-changed-over-the-decades/ [12] https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/weight-management/choosing-a-safe-successful-weight-loss-program [13] https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/weight-loss/in-depth/weight-loss-plateau/art-20044615 [14] https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/news/press-releases/weight-training-appears-key-to-controlling-belly-fat/ [15] https://health.gov/news/blog-bayw/2012/10/how-much-daily-exercise-is-best-for-weight-loss/ [16] https://www.cdc.gov/cancer/dcpc/prevention/policies_practices/physical_activity/guidelines.htm [17] https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/obesity-prevention-source/obesity-causes/diet-and-weight/ [18] https://www.cdc.gov/healthyweight/healthy_eating/index.html
Sign in to follow this