Sign in to follow this  
Live Life ·

What is Prediabetes and Is It Reversible?

By Carole Anderson Lucia

If you’re like many Americans, you’ve likely heard about Type 2 diabetes, an increasingly common medical condition that causes higher-than-normal blood glucose levels.1 But have you heard about prediabetes? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), this condition is often a precursor to diabetes and is even more common: While an estimated 30.2 million American adults had Type 2 diabetes in 2015, 84 million — one in three — had prediabetes. Yet 90 percent of people with prediabetes didn’t even know they had it.2,3 And the condition is on the rise.4

 

Prediabetes is a serious condition, according to the CDC, as it increases your risk of developing not only Type 2 diabetes, but heart disease and stroke as well.5 And if you do go on to develop Type 2 diabetes, the disease can damage many vital body systems over time, including your blood vessels, eyes, heart, kidneys and nerves.6 

 

But the good news is that even if you have prediabetes, there are steps you can take now to help reverse it — and prevent Type 2 diabetes from developing at the same time.3 Here’s how.

What is prediabetes?

Prediabetes_BloodGlucose.jpgAccording to the CDC, prediabetes is diagnosed when your blood glucose levels — also known as your blood sugar levels — are higher than normal but are not high enough for you to be classified as having diabetes.5 With prediabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin well (sometimes referred to as insulin resistance), which causes glucose to accumulate in your bloodstream rather than moving into the cells of your body, as it is supposed to do.7  

 

If you have prediabetes, you are at high risk for developing Type 2 diabetes8 unless you take steps to reverse the condition; it’s estimated that between 15 percent and 30 percent of people with prediabetes will develop Type 2 diabetes within five years if they do not make the recommended lifestyle changes.9 In fact, people who develop Type 2 diabetes almost always have prediabetes first, according to the American Diabetes Association.10

How to know if you have prediabetes

While there are no clear symptoms of prediabetes, some people with the condition do have symptoms similar to those with diabetes, including the following:11   

  • Blurred vision
  • Cuts or bruises that are slow to heal
  • Extreme fatigue
  • Feeling very hungry 
  • Feeling very thirsty
  • Frequent urination 
  • Tingling, pain or numbness in the hands or feet 

 

According to the American Academy of Dermatology,12 having dark patches of velvety skin — called acanthosis nigricans — on your armpits, the back of your neck, or elsewhere can also be a sign of prediabetes.

 

If you do have any of these symptoms, be sure to check with your doctor, as the only way to know for certain whether you have prediabetes is through blood tests. If you do have prediabetes, the American Diabetes Association recommends getting a blood test for Type 2 diabetes every one to two years.10

What causes prediabetes? 

Experts aren’t sure what causes prediabetes, but your genetics and family history seem to be important factors. Other factors that increase your risk include:13 

  • A history of gestational diabetes. You — and your child — are at higher risk of developing prediabetes if you developed gestational diabetes while pregnant
  • Waist size. Men with waists larger than 40 inches and women whose are larger than 35 inches are at increased risk
  • Being inactive. In fact, the less active you are, the greater your risk of prediabetes, according to the Mayo Clinic
  • Being overweight. The more fatty tissue you have — especially in your abdominal area — the more resistant your cells become to insulin
  • Disordered sleep. Having a sleep disorder called obstructive sleep apnea increases your risk. Working night shifts may increase your risk as well
  • High blood pressure.
  • High levels of triglycerides. 
  • Low levels of HDL cholesterol. Known as the “good” kind of cholesterol found in foods like nuts, avocado and olive oil
  • Your age. The risk of prediabetes increases after the age of 45
  • Your dietary habits. Drinking sugar-sweetened beverages is associated with an increased risk, as is eating excessive amounts of processed and red meat    

How to help prevent Type 2 diabetes

If you have been diagnosed with prediabetes, that doesn’t mean you are destined to develop Type 2 diabetes. In fact, according to Harvard Health,14 the vast majority of diabetes — and even prediabetes — can be prevented through lifestyle and diet changes

 

Prediabetes_Walk2.jpgAccording to the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study conducted by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases,15 losing weight and getting regular exercise are the two most important steps you can take to help prevent Type 2 diabetes. Specifically, the study found you can lower your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes by 58 percent by doing two important things: 

  • Losing 7 percent of your body weight
  • Getting 150 minutes of moderate exercise each week — such as walking briskly for 30 minutes, five days a week

What should you eat if you’re prediabetic? 

In addition to getting more exercise, Harvard Health recommends the following dietary modifications if you are at risk of Type 2 diabetes:14

  • Reduce your intake of processed foods and added sugars. This includes refined grains such as white flour and white rice, as well as sugary drinks, including sodas and juices
  • Choose whole grains. Foods made from 100 percent whole grain (such as whole wheat) are a good choice, but intact whole grains — brown rice, corn, oatmeal and quinoa, for instance — are better Prediabetes_MoreVeggies_Edited_2.jpg
  • Increase your fiber. Most vegetables and fruits are high in fiber, as are legumes such as beans, chickpeas, edamame and peas
  • Eat more fruits and vegetables. At least half of what you eat every day should be non-starchy fruits and vegetables — the more colorful, the better
  • Avoid processed red meat. Eating one serving of processed meat a day (such as deli meat and hot dogs) is associated with more than a 50 percent increased risk of developing prediabetes
  • Eat healthier fats. Saturated fats, especially from meats, are associated with an increased risk of diabetes and heart disease. Plant oils, such as extra-virgin olive oil and canola oil, carry less risk, while omega-3 fats, such as those found in walnuts, flax seeds and some fish, are actually healthy for you

 

You also might want to consider trying intermittent fasting, which has been shown to be beneficial for people with prediabetes. In one study of prediabetic men,14 study participants followed an intermittent fasting schedule of eating between 8 a.m. and 2 p.m. for five weeks. After the study period, the participants showed improved insulin sensitivity and other measures of metabolic health, as well as lowered blood pressure and less oxidative stress. Interestingly, they also experienced less hunger in the evening.

 

Prediabetes_IF.jpgJenny Craig’s Rapid Results program integrates time-restricted feeding, a type of intermittent fasting, where you eat over a 12-hour time frame and refrain from food for the following 12-hours (which includes sleep) to let your body’s cells rejuvenate. By eating in accordance with your circadian rhythm, you’ll be working with your body by consuming the majority of your calories when your metabolism is working most optimally. 

 

We hope you’ve been inspired to take steps to help prevent yourself from developing prediabetes. And if you have already been diagnosed with the condition, remember that you have the power to help reverse it — and avoid diabetes at the same time.

 

If you’re ready to focus on improving your diet and lifestyle, Jenny Craig can help! Click here to set up a free appointment with a personal weight loss consultant to discuss your goals and start working towards a healthier you!


1808_JC_Blog_CTA_WorkingFiles_kmj-03.png

 

Sources:

[1] http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/type-2/?loc=util-header_type2
[2] https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/pdfs/data/statistics/national-diabetes-statistics-report.pdf
[3] https://www.cdc.gov/diabetes/takethetest

[4] https://news.psu.edu/story/370127/2015/09/16/medical-minute-incidence-diabetes-and-pre-diabetes-rise
[5] https://www.cdc.gov/features/diabetesprevention/
[6] https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/type-2-diabetes/symptoms-causes/syc-20351193
[7]  https://www.niddk.nih.gov/health-information/diabetes/overview/what-is-diabetes/prediabetes-insulin-resistance
[8] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3891203/
[9] http://endocrinefacts.org/health-conditions/diabetes-2/2-prediabetes/
[10] http://www.diabetes.org/are-you-at-risk/prediabetes/
[11] http://www.diabetes.org/diabetes-basics/symptoms/
[12] https://www.aad.org/public/diseases/other-conditions/diabetes-warning-signs
[13] https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/prediabetes/symptoms-causes/syc-20355278
[14] https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/healthy-lifestyle-can-prevent-diabetes-and-even-reverse-it-2018090514698
[15] https://www.niddk.nih.gov/about-niddk/research-areas/diabetes/diabetes-prevention-program-dpp
[16] https://www.diabetesdaily.com/blog/study-intermittent-fasting-yields-benefits-to-people-with-pre-diabetes-even-without-weight-loss-572626/


User Feedback

Comments

Recommended Comments

There are no comments to display.



Your content will need to be approved by a moderator

Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Add a comment...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


Sign in to follow this  

Read Next

  •  

    PP_CTA_YELLOWBUTTON(1).jpg

     

    1811_JC_BlogImage_StressQuiz-3.jpg