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6 Ways to Feel Awesome on Thanksgiving and Avoid the “Holiday Slide”

Thanksgiving: a holiday that is usually centered around the dinner table with family, friends and copious amounts of delectable food (we see you, pumpkin pie). From succulent roasted turkey to savory side dishes, we’re sure you have a few favorites you look forward to every year. But all of that delicious food can sometimes leave you feeling stuffed and uncomfortable. <br> And if you’re on a journey to better health and weight loss, learning how to navigate this time of year can be especially difficult. Here’s the good news: you can enjoy yourself, feel great on Thanksgiving and still stick to your weight loss goals with a few simple tricks.  <br> Learn how to avoid the “holiday slide” by staying on track with your healthy habits — and make this Thanksgiving your healthiest yet with these six helpful tips.  1. Say yes to breakfast and lunch. Most of the festivities kick off in the afternoon, with many Americans dishing up their Thanksgiving meal between 1-3:00 p.m.1 While it might be tempting to put off breakfast and lunch to get the most out of your dinner, skipping meals will likely leave you feeling tired, cranky and hungry.2 Waiting all day to eat may also make you more likely to overeat when the food is served. Avoid feeling “hangry” by having a healthy breakfast and lunch earlier in the day. If you have a snack between meals, try a nonfat plain Greek yogurt, a hard-boiled egg or a handful of carrot sticks to help you feel more satisfied. 2. Embrace healthier food choices. Ready to build your Thanksgiving plate? Rather than thinking of the holiday as an all-you-can-eat feast, create your plate the way you would any other time of the year. Focusing on plenty of veggies, a portion of lean protein, and a moderate amount of healthy fats and starches are great ways to make a nutritious and satisfying meal.  <br> But before you reach for an extra dinner roll, try this strategy. Ask yourself: <br>“Is this something I can have year-round?” <br> If you answered “yes,” feel free to move on to the next item. Carb-heavy, sugary and deep fried foods are a dime a dozen, especially during the holidays. Pursuing your goal weight doesn’t need to be restrictive — by making mindful choices, you’ll eat the foods you actually want and are special to that specific holiday, and probably enjoy them even more. 3. Portion size is key. How many calories are in a typical Thanksgiving dinner? The results may surprise you: Americans may eat upwards of 4,500 calories during their Thanksgiving dinner alone, according to the Calorie Control Council.3 But that doesn’t mean you have to skip your favorite foods. Pay attention to your portions and refer to our helpful Portion Size Guide as a reference. To keep your portions under control, try filling the majority of your plate with a variety of non-starchy vegetables and fresh salad from the Fresh & Free Additions list. Also, before considering seconds, allow yourself 20-30 minutes to start digesting before putting any other food on your plate — it can take at least 20 minutes for you to begin feeling full.4 4. Make smart swaps. Enjoy your Thanksgiving favorites in new, delicious ways by making simple substitutions. Try these: <br>Spiced sweet potatoes: Skip the marshmallows and turn up the volume on these naturally sweet veggies with aromatic spices. Heat the oven to 375 F. Sprinkle a little cinnamon and nutmeg, a dash of vanilla extract and a spritz of olive oil over sweet potatoes cut into 1-inch cubes. Toss gently to coat. Spread evenly on a foil-lined baking sheet and roast for 25-30 minutes until golden brown and tender. Mash roasted sweet potatoes and serve. If you're on the Jenny Craig program, one serving is about 1 cup of spiced sweet potatoes and equals 2 starches. <br>Healthy green bean casserole: Make two servings with Jenny Craig’s Green Beans with Garlic & Olive Oil and top it with crispy onions. To make the onions, peel and slice a small onion into 1/8-inch rings. Dip rings into an egg white and sprinkle with 2 tablespoons of grated Parmesan cheese along with salt and pepper to taste. (1 tablespoon of Parmesan counts as 1 limited food, if you're on Jenny Craig.) Place onions into an air fryer and give them a quick burst of cooking spray. Flip rings over and spray again. Fry at 400 F for five minutes, or until crispy.5 Heat green beans according to instructions, top with onions and enjoy immediately.  <br>For the Main Event: And if you are on the Jenny Craig program, you can skip laboring for hours in the kitchen and have Thanksgiving dinner ready in less than 10 minutes with Jenny Craig’s Turkey and Wild Rice! Tender turkey, savory wild and brown rice, sweet potatoes and rich gravy make a quick and easy meal. <br>Sweet treat alternatives: Want to end your meal with dessert? Check out these 10 treats that will satisfy your sweet tooth without sidetracking your weight loss. 5. Slow down and savor your meal. If you’ve ever sat down to watch TV with dinner in-hand, gotten distracted by your favorite show and suddenly noticed your plate was empty, you’ve experienced distracted eating. Distracted eating is one of the easiest ways to accidentally overindulge. However, being present and paying attention to your food may make you less likely to overeat during and after your meal.6 <br> Trying mindful eating techniques can help: Use your senses as you eat. Savor the taste, aroma, texture and appearance of the food in front of you.7 Take note of the sensations you experience when you begin to feel full and when you feel completely full.  <br> Eating mindfully doesn’t need to be impractical. Between catching up with friends and family and watching the Thanksgiving Day Parade, you’ll encounter some distractions during the holiday. And if you’re gearing up for the big game on Thanksgiving Day, try creating a portion-conscious plate so that when you’ve finished eating everything on it, you’ll feel less inclined to go back for seconds. 6. Fight the “food coma.” Ever eaten a big meal and wanted to take a nap immediately after? You’re not alone. Feeling drowsy after eating is common, especially after a large meal. Don’t just blame the turkey — your body’s natural circadian rhythm, or your body’s internal clock, might also be making you feel sleepy. At around 1:00 or 1:30 p.m., your body may automatically start to feel tired, whether you’ve eaten or not.8  Add this to a hefty meal, and you’re almost guaranteed to want to take a nap. To avoid feeling extra drowsy, enjoy a light meal with plenty of non-starchy vegetables, skip the alcohol, and consider sipping a cup of coffee if you’re ready to snooze before the festivities are over.6 Shake off any food fatigue by taking a brisk post-meal walk — you’ll get to appreciate the beautiful fall weather while staying active. <br> While food is a big part of Thanksgiving Day, there are plenty of wonderful ways to enjoy yourself that don’t revolve around the dinner table. You have enough on your mind during the holidays: what you eat shouldn’t stress you out! Try these six tips to get the most out of your holiday meal, while still maintaining your weight loss goals. And remember — one meal won’t make or break your weight loss. If you feel yourself moving toward the holiday slide, be kind to yourself and take the time to get yourself back on track the following day.  <br> Ready to learn more about healthy eating strategies for the holidays? Contact a Jenny Craig consultant today to book your free appointment! <br>     Sources: [1] https://www.statista.com/statistics/639837/popular-thanksgiving-meal-times-among-us-consumers/ <br> [2] https://www.womenshealthmag.com/weight-loss/a19981778/effects-of-skipping-meals/ <br> [3] https://www.consumerreports.org/diet-nutrition/calories-in-your-thanksgiving-dinner/ [4] https://www.webmd.com/diet/obesity/features/slow-down-you-eat-too-fast#1 <br> [5] https://www.geniuskitchen.com/recipe/air-fried-onion-rings-530305 <br> [6] https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/distracted-eating-may-add-to-weight-gain-201303296037 <br> [7] https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/mindful-eating/200902/mindful-eating [8] https://www.cnn.com/2017/02/03/health/food-comas-drayer/index.html
Eat Well ·

Weight Loss Tips for Men Over 50

Have you noticed that it seems harder to lose weight — and a bit too easy to gain it — after the age of 50? If so, you’re not alone: Many men find that even if they eat and exercise just as they always have, the pounds still seem to creep on … and are harder to take off. But rest assured that weight loss for men over 50 is possible. By understanding how your body is changing and creating new habits to avoid unwanted weight gain, you can set yourself up for success. Physical Changes in Men Over 50 As you probably can attest to, as you age, you can no longer eat the same way as you did in your 20’s.  That’s because the average, moderately active male aged 51 to 55 needs 400 fewer calories per day than he did between the ages of 21 and 25.1 This may not seem like a big difference, but when you consider that 3,500 extra calories can cause a 1-pound weight gain, it’s easy to see how extra calories can quickly add up to excess pounds.2   After age 30, men also experience a muscle-mass decrease between three and five percent per decade, with most men losing approximately 30 percent of their muscle mass throughout their lifetime.3 And since more muscle means more calories burned, that muscle loss equates to fewer calories burned — and, potentially, more weight gained.4 Additionally, lower testosterone levels can cause an increase in visceral abdominal fat.5   Even though these changes are part of the natural aging process, it doesn’t mean they are an automatic recipe for weight gain. By following these six weight-loss tips, managing and maintaining a healthy weight as a male over the age of 50 is just a few simple lifestyle changes away. Tip 1: You Don’t Need to Be Overly Restrictive When you notice the numbers on the scale creeping up, your first instinct may be to dramatically cut back on the number of calories you eat or try a fad diet to lose weight quickly. However, you’re likely to see the pounds return because these type of extreme changes are usually not sustainable.   To keep your metabolism firing, it’s important to consume enough nutrient-rich calories each day. A healthy diet for men consists of smaller, more frequent meals to keep your metabolism burning fat day in and out.6 Fill your plate with lean protein such as chicken alongside fiber-rich fruits and vegetables. With portion control and frequent meals in mind, you can keep your metabolism moving. Tip 2: Eat with the Sun You can leverage your body’s natural processes — like your circadian rhythm — to maximize your metabolism.7 Circadian rhythm refers to your behavioral and physical patterns over a 24-hour cycle.8 Just as you keep busy during the day with errands, meetings and your to-do list, your metabolism is at its peak in the morning and early afternoon. Conversely, your metabolism is less active at night.   By eating in sync with your circadian rhythm and by allowing your body a critical digestion break (12 hours of not consuming calories in the later evening/night hours), you may be able to enhance your weight loss efforts while potentially preserving muscle mass.9,10 Becoming more aware of your body’s internal clock and enjoying nutrient-rich foods during the day and foregoing late-night meals or snacks can help your body work naturally with the peaks and valleys of your metabolism, helping to optimize weight loss.   Jenny Craig’s Rapid Results program is based on this innovative science. Rapid Results works with your natural circadian rhythm to nourish and rejuvenate your body — allowing your cells and body’s processes to reset during sleep and nourishing it when your metabolism is working most optimally during the day. Tip 3: Rest and Recharge Between the hustle and bustle of everyday life, it can be difficult to get enough sleep. And, as you age, you may find it harder to sleep through the night, which usually means spending fewer hours in a state of deep sleep. Skimping on z’s won’t only leave you feeling groggy the next morning: Increasing research indicates sleep and weight are linked — and not getting enough shut-eye has been shown to have a number of negative effects, including a slower metabolism.11   So, tuck in early or set your alarm clock a little later: The National Sleep Foundation recommends adults between the ages of 26 and 64 aim for seven to nine hours of sleep a night.12 Tip 4: Reach for Foods That Will Keep You Full Stomach rumbling? Fiber and protein can help you stay full for longer.13 What’s more, a study conducted by the U.S National Institutes of Health and published in the Journal of Nutrition suggests that a protein-rich diet may help preserve muscle mass and strength in older adults.14   However, not all proteins are created equal. The American Heart Association recommends opting for lean proteins such as chicken, fish or plant-based (like beans) over red meats which are higher in saturated fat and can raise your LDL (or “bad”) cholesterol.15 Tip 5: Pass Up Sugar-laden Drinks High-calorie drinks such as sugary sodas and alcohol can also add to unwanted weight gain. Instead, try opting for healthier options such as green tea and water.   Not only has research shown that green tea can benefit your health, but it also suggests it may also give your metabolism a slight boost (as can white and Oolong teas).16,17 Try adding lemon slices or a little bit of natural sweetener if you want to add some extra flavor.   If green tea isn’t your kind of flavor, opt for water diffused with some fresh fruit. Water helps maintain your body’s fluids and research indicates drinking water before a meal may reduce your caloric intake.18 By reaching for water instead of a sugary drink, you’ll stay hydrated and on track with your weight loss journey. Tip 6: Implement a Workout Routine Resistance training is good for building muscles, but it’s also an excellent way for you to preserve them, which can counteract natural muscle loss and help keep your metabolism from slowing down.19 If it’s been a while since you’ve picked up a pair of weights, start by using your body weight to build muscle with squats, lunges, push-ups and sit-ups, depending on your fitness ability. As you gain muscle mass and confidence, add weights to the mix — but start slowly to avoid injury. Remember to always consult with your doctor before starting an exercise routine.   Despite the natural body changes that come with age, living a healthy, active life is still an attainable goal. With a few simple lifestyle changes, you can restore your strength and energy while getting healthy and losing weight. Weight loss for men over 50 is absolutely within your reach!   Are you ready to make a change and improve your health with a weight loss program that is backed by scientific research? Contact Jenny Craig for a free appointment to get started today.     Sources: [1] https://health.gov/dietaryguidelines/2015/guidelines/appendix-2/ [2] https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/weight-loss/in-depth/calories/art-20048065 [3] https://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/preserve-your-muscle-mass [4] https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/weight-loss/in-depth/metabolism/art-20046508 [5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1778664 [6] https://www.dukehealth.org/blog/small-frequent-meals-are-better-your-metabolism [7] https://translational-medicine.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12967-016-1044-0 [8] https://www.nigms.nih.gov/education/pages/Factsheet_CircadianRhythms.aspx [9] Longo, Valter D., and Satchidananda Panda. “Fasting, Circadian Rhythms, and Time-Restricted Feeding in Healthy Lifespan.” Cell Metabolism, vol. 23, no. 6, 14 June 2016, pp. 1048–1059., doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2016.06.001. [10] Moro, Tatiana, et al. “Effects of eight weeks of time-Restricted feeding (16/8) on basal metabolism, maximal strength, body composition, inflammation, and cardiovascular risk factors in resistance-Trained males.” Journal of Translational Medicine, vol. 14, no. 1, 2016, doi:10.1186/s12967-016-1044-0.  [11] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4701627/ [12] https://www.sleepfoundation.org/press-release/national-sleep-foundation-recommends-new-sleep-times [13] https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/extra-protein-is-a-decent-dietary-choice-but-dont-overdo-it-201305016145 [14] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4478942/ [15] http://www.heart.org/en/healthy-living/healthy-eating/eat-smart/nutrition-basics/meat-poultry-and-fish-picking-healthy-proteins [16] https://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/health-benefits-of-green-tea#1 [17] https://www.nature.com/ijo/journal/v34/n4/full/ijo2009299a.html [18] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19661958 [19] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8175496
Eat Well ·

Ask an R.D.: Does Counting Calories Hinder or Help Weight Loss?

You’ve probably heard the saying that successful weight loss boils down to calories in, calories out. Many weight loss programs are built around this basic premise — you count and track what you eat, logging every food and drink you consume — then tally up your total daily, making sure you stay within a certain range.  <br> But reaching a healthy weight involves other lifestyle aspects — and calorie counting for weight loss may not be the only thing impacting the scale. We asked our Jenny Craig Registered Dietitian, Briana Rodriquez, to help us debunk six common calorie counting myths and explain why meticulously tracking calories shouldn’t be your only focus when it comes to better health.  Calorie basics A kilocalorie, commonly referred to as a calorie, is a measure of energy. In the context of weight loss and weight gain, it measures the energy from the foods and beverages that you consume.1 This energy is what allows your body to function properly. Try not to think of them as being “good” or “bad,” Rodriquez says. They’re the fuel that allows you to do everything from eating and digesting to breathing and walking.1  Myth #1: All calories are created equal.   The truth: Calorie counting diets support this myth by relying on the amount of food you eat to predict your weight loss. Numbers are assigned to different foods based on the macronutrients they provide, and once you’ve eaten the maximum number of calories in your meal, you’re expected to stop. But using food to support your weight loss efforts isn’t just about quantity, it’s also about quality.  <br> In terms of energy measurements, Rodriquez explains, 100 calories of chips versus 100 calories of carrots are the same. However, the sources of those calories have very different effects on your hunger cues, hormones, and energy levels.2 While it’s still important to track how much you eat for weight loss, it’s equally important to track what kinds of food you eat. <br> Try using this helpful infographic to use portion sizes as a guide, rather than only using the number of calories on a nutritional label. Myth #2: It doesn’t matter when you eat as long as you’re staying within your calorie limit.   The truth: It’s just as crucial to pay attention to when you eat. Your body functions on a 24-hour cycle, known as your circadian rhythm. When you eat in tandem with your circadian rhythm, you’ll use 12 hours to fuel your body with nutritious foods when your metabolism is most optimal and the remaining 12 hours to allow it to rest and rejuvenate. Using healthy, delicious meals and snacks in mindful portions, Jenny Craig’s Rapid Results program follows this 24-hour cycle to work with your circadian rhythm and enables this natural process to benefit your weight loss.3   Myth #3: Once you hit your “calorie limit,” you won’t feel hungry.   The truth: Calorie counting may cause you to ignore your body’s natural hunger cues. If you’re following the number of calories on your food tracking app, you may feel the need to ignore your grumbling stomach until you can eat again. Waiting too long to eat can become unhealthy when you experience lightheadedness, dizziness or nausea. Experts recommend eating every three to five hours, since it takes time to digest the food you’ve eaten.4 <br> Skip strict calorie counting apps, advises Rodriquez, and enjoy balanced meals and snacks that include vegetables, fruits, lean protein sources and whole grains to help you reduce hunger and feel fuller longer.5,6   Myth #4: If you follow your calorie count, you’ll get the nutrients you need.   The truth: Let’s go back to the potato chips and carrots example. While 100 calories’ worth of chips and carrots share the same caloric number, they don’t share the same nutrients. A 100-calorie serving of raw carrots offers high amounts of calcium and vitamin A, nutrients that may help promote bone and eye health.7,8 In comparison, the same size serving of salted potato chips only offers 4 mg calcium and no vitamin A — missing healthful vitamins and minerals that could help you feel your best.9 What’s more, the potato chips won’t leave you feeling as satiated, since 100 calories of chips is a much smaller quantity of food compared to 100 calories worth of carrots.  Myth #5: Fruit is healthy, so I can eat an unlimited amount.    The truth: All foods can contribute to weight gain (even “free” foods), especially in large amounts. Take fresh fruit, for example. Some calorie-focused weight loss programs propose that you can eat as much fruit as you want and still lose weight. And while fruit is a great source of dietary fiber and nutrients, the amount of sugar it contains is best consumed in moderation if you are aiming for weight loss. Rodriquez suggests aiming for two servings a day.  <br> The sugar in fruit comes from fructose (which is different from glucose, or blood sugar), and is processed by the liver. When your liver has enough energy, it’s more likely to turn this excess fructose into fat to save it for later.10 To reduce the amount of fructose you eat, try including more non-starchy vegetables, which are lower in calories and sugar. Myth #6: A calorie counting app is all you need to stay on track.   The truth: Basing how many calories you consume in a day off how many you “burn” according to your fitness app may not yield accurate results, Rodriquez notes. The apps and equations that show your recommended level of calories are helpful but can be unreliable. A recent study of popular fitness trackers explored calorie feedback — the most inaccurate one was off by 93 percent!11   <br> A fitness tracker is a useful tool to have during your weight loss journey, but it shouldn’t be the only one you use. Other tools, like choosing healthy portion sizes, reaching for fresh fruits and vegetables, incorporating exercise and eating with your circadian rhythm will all help you to find balance along the way. <br> Calorie counting can often feel like an overly complicated and stressful ordeal. Having a general idea of the calories you consume per day can be helpful, but it shouldn’t control your life. Eating is meant to be an enjoyable experience, not a math problem.     <br> Ready to work toward healthy weight loss — without the calorie craze? Jenny Craig’s nutritionist-approved, chef-crafted meals take the guesswork out of great meals. Each meal, snack and dessert are well balanced with the nutrition you need and foods you’ll love, without the added stress of counting calories. You’ll also receive one-on-one weight loss consultations to support you during your journey. Get started today by scheduling your free appointment with a consultant!     Sources: [1] https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/counting-calories-101 [2] https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/6-reasons-why-a-calorie-is-not-a-calorie [3] Longo, Valter D., and Satchidananda Panda. “Fasting, Circadian Rhythms, and Time-Restricted Feeding in Healthy Lifespan.” Cell Metabolism, vol. 23, no. 6, 14 June 2016, pp. 1048–1059., doi:10.1016/j.cmet.2016.06.001. [4] https://www.thisisinsider.com/how-often-should-i-be-eating-during-the-day-2018-5 [5] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18448177 [6] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10721886 [7] https://bit.ly/2PtVgV0 [8] https://www.nichd.nih.gov/health/topics/bonehealth/conditioninfo/calcium [9] https://bit.ly/2CEK6WR [10] https://www.shape.com/weight-loss/food-weight-loss/ask-diet-doctor-fruit-really-free-diet-food [11] https://www.nbcnews.com/better/diet-fitness/your-apple-watch-or-fitbit-making-you-fat-n764066
Eat Well ·

8 of the Best Foods to Boost Your Energy Naturally

Need a little extra boost? Check out the 8 best foods for energy in this slideshow!  
Eat Well ·

10 Sweet Treat Alternatives Just In Time For Halloween

Satisfy your sweet tooth without the added sugar! Check out these simple sweet treat alternatives!
Eat Well ·

Coffee Lovers Rejoice! Here are 6 Health Benefits You Can Get from Your Daily Cup of Joe

Love coffee? You’re not alone. Over 2.25 billion cups of coffee are estimated to be consumed in the world—daily.1 Besides being a popular way to start the morning, new research is unveiling coffee’s surprising health benefits. Whether you like your coffee hot or iced, there are even more reasons to love this powerhouse beverage.    We’ll drink to that!   1. It’s part of a healthy lifestyle (and may even help you live longer!). Whether you enjoy decaf or regular, ground or instant coffee, it may help you live longer compared to non-coffee drinkers, a new study from JAMA Internal Medicine says.2 Participants were studied over a 10-year period and drank anywhere from one to eight cups of coffee per day. The researchers found that coffee drinking was inversely associated with mortality. So, go ahead, enjoy that extra cup of coffee!   2. It might decrease your liver cancer and liver disease risk. Your liver is an essential organ that helps to break down fat and filter blood before it circulates throughout the rest of the body. Drinking coffee brewed showed a lowered risk of chronic liver disease in high risk individuals, a study of almost 10,000 people revealed.3 Another study examined existing research from 1966-2007 and found that increasing one’s daily coffee consumption by two cups may reduce the risk of liver cancer.4   3. Coffee may benefit heart health. If you don’t like coffee, these studies might help you have a change of heart. Scientists found a possible link between caffeine and heart health when they discovered caffeinated cells kept damaged heart cells from dying.5 However, since it was an animal study, more research is needed to understand the effect on humans.5 Japanese researchers observed a lower risk of cardiovascular disease-related deaths in coffee drinkers between the ages of 40 and 79.6 These findings may point to coffee helping to decrease the risk of cardiovascular disease, but more research is needed to solidify this conclusion.     4. The caffeine in coffee may boost short and long-term memory. Feeling forgetful? One study showed participants who ingested 100 milligrams of caffeine (about two cups of coffee) showed improved short-term memory skills.7 Tests showed brain activity in the area that controls working memory, which helps you remember things for a short time. Researchers concluded caffeine may help to regulate the brain’s short-term memory functions.8 A separate study from Johns Hopkins University explored the effects of 200 milligrams of caffeine on memory. This increased dosage showed participants were less likely to forget images they’d seen the day before, suggesting caffeine helped their long-term memory over a 24-hour period.9   5. It may improve alertness and positivity. Nothing says “teamwork” like a cup of coffee. Ohio State University released research from two studies suggesting that drinking caffeinated coffee may improve feelings of positivity among people working as a group. In the first study, half the participants drank coffee before debating a controversial topic, while the other half had coffee after the discussion. The test group who’d had coffee first reported being more alert and spoke positively about their team members’ contributions, compared to those who drank coffee later. The second study was similar, where half the participants had caffeinated coffee, while the others had decaf. Again, results showed the group who had caffeinated coffee were more alert and provided more positive reviews of their peers.10 So, the next time you’re about to head into a big meeting, consider taking a quick coffee break first!   6. Coffee could help (temporarily) kick-start your weight loss. Some studies show the caffeine in coffee may temporarily boost your metabolic rate, or the speed of your metabolism, a few hours after consuming it.11-12  Your metabolism is the chemical process that provides energy for your body.  Along with an increase in metabolic rate, one study showed increased levels of fat oxidation, or using fat as energy.13-14  So it may not be a bad idea to enjoy a regular cup of coffee along with a variety of delicious, healthy foods and regular exercise! Wake up and smell the coffee!   If you look like this before your morning cup o’ joe, we totally get it. <br> Whether you’re a coffee aficionado or a casual sipper, there are so many reasons to enjoy one of the world’s most popular beverages. Aside from tasting great and providing a jolt of caffeine, new studies continue to uncover coffee’s many perks. As with all foods and beverages, it’s best to have it in moderation. And check with your healthcare provider if you experience any adverse effects while consuming caffeine.  <br> Cheers to good health! Interested in learning more about how to lose weight the healthy way while enjoying your favorite foods–and coffee? Get in touch with a Jenny Craig consultant to set up your free appointment today! <br>   Sources: [1] http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.571.8956&rep=rep1&type=pdf <br> [2] https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamainternalmedicine/article-abstract/2686145 <br> [3] https://www.gastrojournal.org/article/S0016-5085(05)01774-9/abstract?referrer=http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16344061 <br> [4] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0016508507005689 <br> [5] https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-healthy-addiction-coffee-study-finds-more-health-benefits/ <br> [6] https://jech.bmj.com/content/65/3/230 <br> [7] https://press.rsna.org/timssnet/media/pressreleases/pr_target.cfm?ID=270 <br> [8] https://press.rsna.org/timssnet/media/pressreleases/pr_target.cfm?ID=270 <br> [9] https://hub.jhu.edu/2014/01/12/caffeine-enhances-memory/ [10] https://news.osu.edu/coffee-helps-teams-work-together-study-suggests/ <br> [11] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7486839 <br> [12] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2912010 <br> [13] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7369170 <br> [14] https://www.encyclopedia.com/sports/sports-fitness-recreation-and-leisure-magazines/fat-oxidation
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