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Can I feed my son the Jenny Craig food?


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#1 Gerbil

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 09:47 AM

I'm a single mother of a teenage boy.  I'm seriously overweight.  My son is a big guy,  but he plays offensive line on the high school football team, and works out a lot, so it's almost all muscle.  His doctor says that right now he's fine, but that he'll need to watch his weight as he gets older and his activity level drops.  

 

I'd like to start Jenny Craig, but one of my concerns is family dinner.  It's important to me that we eat together, but I also worry that if I'm coming home from work hungry and tired, cooking a dinner without being tempted to eat it will be tough.

 

So, my question is, could I feed him the Jenny Craig dinners too, and just add stuff so he's getting enough calories?  So, for example, if we're having beef stew, and salad, he could add some croutons or grated parmesan and use what ever dressing he chooses, plus a side of whole grain bread, as much fruit as he wants for dessert, and a glass of milk, while I skip the bread and butter, only put Jenny approved things on my salad, skip the bread, take one serving of fruit and drink water?  

 

Then of course he'd eat regular for breakfast, lunch and snacks.

 

Would that be a healthy choice for him?


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#2 SonyaCele

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 10:13 AM

if you're gonna feed him JC food, is he gonna be on the JC program and seeing a JC counselor also?  that would be my recommendation.  Hes gonna need a  whole lot more calories than what is in the JC meals and i think it would be a great idea to get him nutrutional counseling at a young age.    He needs to learn his calorie level and eat appropriately, the right amount of the right choices.  If he eats JC food, and is a football player, he's gonna need a whole lot  nutritionally solid food than what you are describing.


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When you look in the mirror and see no change, and still keep faith, knowing that in time you will get there if you stay focused and on track, that's the difference between those who succeed and those who fail.


5'4", 46 years old, start date 7/18/2012 236.4 lbs, i work out a lot.
 


10/19/14  week 1 - in process

 

weight.png


#3 Gerbil

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 10:25 AM

Just to clarify, he'd still be eating non JC food for breakfast, lunch, all snacks (he usually has a snack before practice, and another when he gets home before dinner, sometimes one before bread), and dinner whenever he or I is away from the house, which is usually 2 - 3 times a week.  

 

So, the JC food would be like a tenth of what he's eating. 

 

i wouldn't take him to a JC counselor, because I see that as something for people who are doing the complete diet, not having a JC food a few times a week. 


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#4 SonyaCele

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Posted 24 June 2014 - 10:52 AM

well yeah he could eat the JC food, its just kinda expensive to eat without the benefit of the counseling,   but if he likes it, go for it.    I have a teenage son, too,  and i'm forced to make him things like trip tip and baked potatoes  to keep him filled.  A jc dinner would barely be an appetizer for him.    But now that i know proper nutrition, i am teaching it to him also, making sure his plate and his day is very well balanced with healthy foods and the right amount.    whether he chooses to eat like that is his choice, but at least he's learning good food choices.

Its hard cooking food for him that i can't, and he's learned to cook his own food, and we've rearranged our eating habits so our lives dont revolve around eating.  Dinner is more about us socalizing and talking about our day , and relaxing than it is about what is on our plates.   It was really hard at first, i couldn't even be in the same room with his meals, but almost 2  years later i have no problem cooking anything and not eating it, or just having a proper size portion.  It just takes time to retrain ourslves.   but like i said before, its a short amount of time invested that will benefit us the rest of our lives.


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When you look in the mirror and see no change, and still keep faith, knowing that in time you will get there if you stay focused and on track, that's the difference between those who succeed and those who fail.


5'4", 46 years old, start date 7/18/2012 236.4 lbs, i work out a lot.
 


10/19/14  week 1 - in process

 

weight.png





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